Reliance And Replenish

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Name boards of old Fife fishing boats in a museum in Anstruther, from my recent Scottish travels.

It’s all in a name, as they say.

I love these two names.

Reliance.

Replenish.

Names that speak to virtues of dependability and sustainability.

Symbols of strength to call on when braving the often harsh maritime environment.

Symbols are really just things that remind us of what we are about.

Playing pretend now – if you had a boat or ship, what would you name it?

Taking that one step further, if your life was a symbol or virtue ,what would it be?

 

Impossible Gargoyle

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Medieval, fantastical – a gurning gargoyle projects outwards from a cathedral wall.

I love the sheer needlessness of gargoyles, and their impossibility.

This gargoyle is also a chimera, a genetic hybrid of two different creatures,in this case something doglike with bird wings.

A chimera also means an idea that is absurd or simply impossible.

I initially thought there was only one gargoyle  in this picture. On closer examination I think there might actually be three more smaller ones on the buttress  below our winged friend,one upside down.

Maybe I am imagining it.

That would be impossible…

 

To Cross Over

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                                                                     Footbridge, Raglan NZ

 

What does it take to cross over to the place where you want to be?

From misery to happiness.

From loneliness to love.

From failure to success.

What does it take?

Some sort of bridge, some way to cross over that which threatens to engulf you.

And when you find that bridge it will look like this one – not easy, straight, wide or comfortable.

And you, and only you (not even the ones who tell you it can be done) will have to walk it.

Gravestones And Battlements

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It was a dismal weekday afternoon as we trekked towards Calton Hill in Edinburgh.

Then, joy of joys, just before  our destination I saw some stone stairs leading up to a small cemetery.

Like a rat up a drainpipe, I quickly found my way to this vista, with looming castle battlements to ice the proverbial cake.

Victorian gothic nirvana!

I would have lingered, but my wife and daughter were less than impressed with another funereal photographic detour.

I rejoined them, and when we reached the top of the Hill, the drizzle became hard rain, forming waterfalls down the steps.

So wet, so grey…and I was so happy with it all.

Sometimes I wonder what the f**k is wrong with me.

 

Victoria Blushed

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An optimistic view of London’s Victoria Station on arrival by train  – looking up at the glassed roof stretching forever (or so it seems).

Well, an optimist always looks up – always.

And sees the view through rose-tinted glasses.

In a way this picture captures the hopefulness that travel brings to me – the pursuit of the new and the dream of the possible.

 

The Dear Burden

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The last post, Monumental, featured a dark monument to Sir Walter Scott

A monument is a sort of epitaph in stone. And often as lifeless as the departed.

But it is the words of great writers like Scott that live on, timeless and relevant.

Summing up what we ourselves cannot articulate.

Powerful.

I wish to god that I personally had not to go through a recent hellish time in my life when those words were way too relevant – but I am glad I clung to what was dear.

Cheers Walter…

Monumental

Sixty one metres of Victorian Gothic goodness towers above Edinburgh’s Princes Street, in tribute to literary great Sir Walter Scott.

The monument is grimy and blackened with weather and age and is all the more striking for it.

The below view, in darkened silhouette, emphasises the spectral in the structure.

Scott was a man of letters – novelist, playwright, historian. I, on the other hand, am somewhat of a philistine  – his monument appears to me as if Dracula had a hand in designing Thunderbird 3(the coolest Thunderbirds rocket)!

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Scott Monument, Edinburgh

Ain’t No Saint

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Portrait of a blogger – me, Andy L.

Almost a year into this blogging gig, and since I am always behind the lens for the pictures you see here, thought it time to move around the front and say hello.

This shot was taken last month on the harbour in the lovely Fife town of St. Andrews, with its famous ancient castle and abbey ruins, some of which can be seen in the background.

As the place is named for the patron saint of Scotland, my namesake, it seemed appropriate.

Not that I am any sort of saint, mind .This picture has a dark haloed effect, just in case   you get the wrong idea….

 

 

Seahorse In The Sky

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Have you passed by a place a thousand times and never noticed something, and then suddenly you do?

I had one  of those  moments during the  week ,when I had a few minutes up my sleeve  and stopped on the way to my work shift up at the marae.

Okaku Bay is a lovely flat beach on the Waitemata Harbour in Auckland and the seahorse statue atop a column adorns the art deco changing sheds there. How I had never spotted it before I don’t know.

In my recent travel overseas I filled my photographic  boots with all sorts of animalistic symbols – lion, wolves, and unicorns, to name a few, so perhaps had become attuned to seeing such things. Travel in new places causes us to look at home with fresh eyes, too.

It’s all about the magic in the mundane, where ordinary buildings and spaces come alive with images of fantastic creatures. The seahorse discovery transformed my routine day!