Half Buried Memories

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‘Half Buried Memories’

No, it’s not the results of a New Zealand earthquake, but rather a sculptural piece in Auckland commenting (perhaps) on the loss of historical buildings, and that greater emotional loss which accompanies that process.

While I was taking the picture on the weekend, a colourful local approached and told me that he had opposed the sculpture’s installation years ago. A “waste of money” ,”not actually real”. Just attracted people wanting to take photos (“like me?”, I asked smilingly).

That was as may be, but there was no getting around the period in  the 1980s when developers, according to the bloke, were hell bent on pulling down old buildings and replacing them with new and shiny edifices, before new “heritage” planning rules prevented them doing so without some preservation measures being undertaken.

It is a burial site of a kind, even if “not real”, and evokes the feelings you associate with those places.

In the background, the newer high rise buildings of downtown can be seen through the trees.

There will come a time when they too will be demolished to make way for something “better” and more progressive.

And only memories will remain.

 

 

 

Juxtaposition

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‘Juxtaposition’

The old is juxtaposed against the new in this shot of two Auckland buildings.

I always enjoy striking contrasts of any kind, especially when they are absolutely cheek by jowl.

Diversity of form and thought are precious, but often the closer you look at very different things ,the more you see the similarities.

In this case,  the use of white paint and symmetry, even though the overall stylings are massively different.

At any gathering of people there will be contrasting outlooks and personalities and varied back stories, somehow inhabiting the same place and time, for, at least, similar purposes.

Enjoy your juxtapositions!

 

 

 

 

Gaudi Curves

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I have posted elsewhere on this blog on my attraction to curving, non-linear forms.

They are truly like life,which as we all can attest, does not run in straight lines.

Antoni Gaudi’s architecture in Barcelona has taken that principle to extremes.

Observing that straight lines are only rarely found in nature, and from his belief that true art must stem from nature, he created many stunning and idiosyncratic designs in this town.

Pictured is the facade of the famous  Casa Batllo in the central city.

Jawdropping really!

The appeal to me,and the hordes of visitors to Gaudi’s creations, is that of nature’s truth.

What at first appears as fantasist madness is actually something that speaks to us deeply.

As an aside, Barcelona, apart from the old Rambla area in the centre  has a grid street network and I have managed to lose direction several times in its maze of straight line roads!

 

Turret House

20190818_193001Cool house turret in Ponsonby, inner Auckland City.

Turrets are alluring to me.

Why?

Gothic charm, for sure.

Any shape, as long as it fits the bill – round, square, hexagonal, octagonal even; flat- topped or pointy like a witch’s hat.

Something left over from ancient times; a throwback.

A detached but special view over the world below.

Exclusive – most of them are not built for a crowd. Party for one, or two, maybe?

They reek of twisted fairy tales. A friend recognised a house from a photo I took of another turreted specimen nearby to this one, and told me it was known to him as the ‘The Tin Man House’.

Lastly,the very fact that they are not essential to the structure of whatever building they are tacked onto, but utterly transform the place when added. A paradox of design!